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Compassion Seattle Submits 64,155 Petition Signatures for Charter Amendment 29 to Qualify for the November Ballot 

Amendment receives overwhelming support from Seattle voters who want a plan to help the homeless and end the city’s ineffective approach to the homelessness crisis

Thursday, July 1, 2021 (SEATTLE) —

Today, Compassion Seattle submits 64,155 petition signatures to the Office of the City Clerk to have Charter Amendment 29, an initiative to help the homeless people of Seattle and re-open our parks and public spaces to everyone, be placed on the November 2021 ballot.

Securing more than double the required 33,060 signatures in just a little over four weeks, Compassion Seattle has overcome harassment, theft of petitions, assault and significant time delays. The 64,155 signatures reflect a momentum and a mandate from the people of Seattle that action cannot wait. Now, the King County Department of Elections will validate that enough signatures have been collected, after which the Seattle City Council will act to place Charter Amendment 29 on the November ballot.

“The people of Seattle have spoken. Charter Amendment 29 outlines a clear plan to address the city’s homelessness crisis and we believe it is the right path forward,” said Sound President and CEO Patrick Evans.

Charter Amendment 29 funds urgently needed treatment of mental health and substance use disorders, establishes an individualized and culturally competent process to bring unsheltered people inside, and requires 2,000 new units of emergency housing within 12 months of adoption, including enhanced shelter, tiny homes and hotels.

“This important milestone for Charter Amendment 29 is a tremendous win for the residents of Seattle, especially those experiencing homelessness,” said Pallet Founder and CEO Amy King. “As an organization that has helped thousands of people obtain shelter – and ultimately housing – across America, it’s exciting to see great support for a plan that addresses the complex and varied needs of the unhoused neighbors right here in our home city.”

“Charter Amendment 29 is the plan we have been waiting for since the City declared an emergency more than six years ago. Now the voters of Seattle will have their opportunity to make their voices heard,” said SODO Business Improvement Area Executive Director Erin Goodman.

“Collecting more than 60,000 signatures in less than a month during challenging circumstances sends a clear message,” said DSA President & CEO Jon Scholes. “Seattle voters want a plan to get our homeless neighbors inside and on a path to stability.”

 

Compassion Seattle’s Statement on ACLU-WA’s Statement on Charter Amendment 29

Wednesday, June 9, 2021 — Despite what the ACLU says, Charter Amendment 29 does not promote sweeps, nor do we believe sweeps to be an effective practice to help those living unsheltered. That is why the Amendment requires creation of 2,000 units of emergency housing and expansion of behavioral health services.

Charter Amendment 29 does not criminalize homelessness; it says nothing about law enforcement. It does require expansion of diversion programs so police, prosecutors, defense attorneys and the courts can decide on a case-by-case basis whether treatment and other individualized services are better than arrest and prosecution.

Charter Amendment 29 is focused on resolving the crisis of unsheltered people living in our parks, playgrounds, sidewalks, and other public spaces. This is a crisis we can all see with our own eyes. The Amendment is about addressing the needs of those living outside today, not in several years when more affordable housing is available. Of course, we acknowledge the need for more permanent affordable housing, including supportive housing, but our housing supply shortage doesn’t mean we should ignore those living outdoors today.

Charter Amendment 29 recognizes the racial inequities among those experiencing homelessness and prioritizes specific steps to address this important issue.

Charter Amendment 29 is all about increasing behavioral health services and creating more emergency housing units so people can be brought inside and receive the help they deserve. And it’s about doing it now, not waiting for the housing supply shortage to be resolved at some future time. The conditions people are living in outside in our community are often unsafe, unhealthy, and inhumane. Our neighbors deserve better and maintaining the status quo only hurts our chances of making any real, measurable progress. We can do better.

 

Compassion Seattle to Begin Petition Signature Collection After Revision to Charter Amendment 29’s Ballot Title Language

Seattle voters can sign the petition between May 27, 2021 and June 25, 2021

Tuesday, May 25, 2021 (SEATTLE) — Today, King County Superior Court ruled and made very minor revisions to Charter Amendment 29’s ballot title language following a challenge made by a small group of opposition activists. Compassion Seattle will officially begin its petition signature collection on May 27, 2021, from Seattle voters who support the amendment’s approach to hold the City of Seattle accountable with a comprehensive plan to end the homelessness crisis.

“Charter Amendment 29 is for those who are tired of the excuses and debate, and who instead want a plan, results and progress,” said SODO Business Improvement Area Executive Director Erin Goodman.

Charter Amendment 29 establishes an individualized and culturally competent process for encampment removal, and funds urgently needed treatment of mental health and substance use disorders. It requires 2,000 new units of emergency housing, including enhanced shelter, tiny homes and hotels. These emergency and temporary housing options are critical and have been used by both the City of Seattle and King County to house hundreds of otherwise homeless residents.

Charter Amendment 29 will be available for signature between May 27, 2021, and June 25, 2021. Only registered Seattle voters are eligible to sign. A total of 33,060 verified signatures are necessary to place the amendment on the November 2021 ballot.

“Over 70% of voters support Charter Amendment 29 and it’s time to take action—we need signatures,” said Downtown Seattle Association President and CEO Jon Scholes. “Now is the time to support a concrete plan for treatment, services and housing to bring people inside.”

Those in support of the amendment can sign the petition a variety of ways, including:

  • Download the Petition. Supporters can download the petition form directly from Compassion Seattle’s website, obtain signatures of friends and family and return it by mail to Compassion Seattle P.O. Box 21961, Seattle, Wash. 98111 or drop it at the Compassion Seattle office. The petition must be printed double-sided in black ink. For further directions on downloading and signing the form, visit www.compassionseatttle.org.
  • Visit Compassion Seattle’s Office. Located at 616 Olive Way (between 6th and 7th Avenue) in downtown Seattle, supporters can stop in and sign between the hours of 10am and 6pm, Monday through Friday.
  • Locate Citywide Signature Collectors. Signature collectors will be available throughout the city in various public spaces, including parks, farmers markets and outside of retail stores. Signature collectors will be clearly marked with a Compassion Seattle badge and will follow strict COVID-19 protocols. These locations will change on an ongoing basis, and supporters can find updated information on Compassion Seattle’s social media pages, including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

For more information about Charter Amendment 29 and instructions on how and where to sign the petition, please visit compassionseattle.org and follow on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook for updates.

 

Civic and Community Groups Update Charter Amendment to Further Strengthen Compassionate Plan to End Homelessness Crisis

Compassion Seattle refiles its City of Seattle Charter Amendment on April 15, 2021

Friday, April 16, 2021 (SEATTLE) — Following continued discussions with various area organizations committed to resolving Seattle’s homelessness crisis, Compassion Seattle has refiled its City of Seattle Charter Amendment with updated language clarifying the tangible, supportive actions that the City will have to take to solve this problem.

The updated Charter Amendment, filed on Thursday, April 15, includes new language doubling down on the initiative’s person-centered approach to fixing this crisis, noting that any work relocating people to housing should avoid any “possible harm to individuals caused by closing encampments” and that when closing encampments, it is “City policy to avoid, as much as possible, dispersing people, except to safe and secure housing.” The Charter Amendment reaffirms the City’s ability to close encampments that create “problems related to public health or safety or interferes with the use of the public spaces by others.”

Additionally, there is a new clause sunsetting the measure in December 2027, six years after passage of the Charter Amendment by the voters of Seattle.

“It’s clear that the residents of this city are seeking a nonpartisan and humane approach to fixing this problem, one that is more than just words and empty promises,” said Mike Stewart, executive director of Ballard Alliance. “With the additional language further clarifying the actions that the city will need to take, a smart, compassionate plan just got even better.”

Elements of the plan include:

  • Requiring the city, in conjunction with King County, to deploy a behavioral health rapid-response capability as an alternative, where appropriate, to a law-enforcement crisis response.
  • Requiring the city to provide an additional 2,000 units of emergency or permanent housing within one year of the charter amendment being adopted by Seattle voters.
  • Prioritizing factors known to drive the overrepresentation of Black, Indigenous, and other people of color experiencing homelessness.
  • Proposing a coordinated plan to move people experiencing homelessness into emergency and permanent housing, instead of living in encampments, including enhanced shelters, tiny houses, hotel-motel rooms and other forms of non-congregate emergency or permanent housing.
  • Directing the city government to accelerate the production of emergency and permanent housing by waiving building permit fees, treating housing permit applications as “first-in-line” for expedited treatment and refunding to the payee the city’s portion of the sales tax paid for these facilities (as long as the declared civil emergency related to homelessness is in effect).
  • Dedicating annual funding equal to at least 12% of the City of Seattle’s General Fund budget to help achieve the plan and provide other human services. If this 12% allocation were in effect this year, it would have raised human services funding to nearly $193 million, approximately $18 million higher than currently budgeted.

“We have been proud to work closely with a wide variety of organizations to come up with a set of consensus solutions that not only tackle this crisis in the most compassionate way possible but also attract more partners to join this important effort,” said Erin Goodman, executive director of SODO Business Improvement Area. “With these new changes in place, we are confident that this initiative will receive even more support from those who live and do business in Seattle.”

Social Service, Business and Neighborhood Leaders Advance Plan to Address Chronic Homelessness and Racial Inequities Among the Homeless Population

Proposed City of Seattle Charter Amendment would require provision of low-barrier, rapid-access mental health and substance use disorder services combined with emergency and permanent housing; poll data show 71% in favor of amendment’s approach

Thursday, April 1, 2021 (SEATTLE) — A group of diverse civic and community members, business and neighborhood leaders, has filed a City of Seattle Charter Amendment focused on tangible, supportive solutions for the homelessness crisis that has grown worse during the Covid-19 pandemic. Homeless services and housing providers have also expressed their strong support for the proposed measure.

The groups worked collaboratively to craft specific action steps to address homelessness through a citizen initiative to amend the City Charter. It would require the city to provide low-barrier, rapid-access mental health and substance use disorder and services; field engagement; and emergency and permanent housing options with a focus on people with high barriers to services and those who are chronically homeless.

Behavioral health support is often a key missing component of current interventions. Along with the mandate to provide immediate care related to mental health and substance use disorder, the plan requires the city to provide an additional 2,000 units of emergency or permanent housing within one year of the charter amendment being adopted by Seattle voters. Results from a February 2021 poll show 71% of Seattle voters are in favor of the charter amendment’s approach, including the focus on behavioral health services. The charter amendment requires the city, in conjunction with King County, to deploy a behavioral health rapid-response capability as an alternative, where appropriate, to a law-enforcement crisis response.

The amendment also prioritizes addressing factors known to drive the overrepresentation of Black, Indigenous, and other people of color experiencing homelessness.

The amendment further proposes a coordinated plan to move people experiencing homelessness into emergency and permanent housing, instead of living in encampments, including enhanced shelters, tiny houses, hotel-motel rooms and other forms of non-congregate emergency or permanent housing. It requires the city to ensure that “city parks, playgrounds, sports fields, public spaces and sidewalks and streets remain open and clear of encampments” once the programs and services required by the amendment are made available.

As long as the declared civil emergency related to homelessness is in effect, the charter amendment directs the city government to accelerate the production of emergency and permanent housing by waiving building permit fees, treating housing permit applications as “first-in-line” for expedited treatment and refunding to the payee the city’s portion of the sales tax paid for these facilities. The amendment also allows the city to waive normal land-use regulations, to the full extent permitted by state law, so emergency and permanent housing can be more quickly established.

The charter amendment petition will be available for signature in April. Signatures will be gathered through early June. It is the goal to have the measure placed on the November 2021 ballot for city voters. To qualify for the ballot, the signatures of at least 33,060 registered Seattle voters must be collected.

The last official count of people living unsheltered in Seattle, completed in January 2020, estimated there are 3,738 individuals living in unauthorized encampments and vehicles in Seattle. These individuals are living outdoors in tents and other structures in parks, playgrounds, sports fields, sidewalks and streets, and in vehicles.

Support from community and civic leaders

“We can and should be doing more for our people experiencing homelessness. We need a committed, concerted effort that prioritizes mental health and drug addiction support,” said Erin Goodman, executive director of SODO Business Improvement Area. “By shifting existing funds and resources to address critical human services, we can prioritize helping our city’s most vulnerable people with the most basic needs and ensure public health and safety for our community.”

“I’m excited for this initial first step in ensuring an equitable response towards the crisis we are currently facing. The only way to address the unjust racial disparities is with an all-encompassing culturally appropriate approach in every aspect from the outreach to the physical placement,” said Derrick Belgarde, deputy director at Chief Seattle Club.

“We’ve seen recently that almost everyone living on our streets is willing to relocate to a hotel room or other lodging that feels secure and leads to permanent housing, not back to the street a week or so later. We’ve also seen that many people have major barriers and need a lot of support, at least initially. This framework offers the promise of actually prioritizing the people who have been left out for so long and making a plan that will reach and sustain them with assistance they welcome,” said Lisa Daugaard, director at Public Defender Association.

“We know the need for emergency housing in our region is vast, so the idea of opening 2,000 housing units in conjunction with behavioral health services is something we have long supported. However, we know from previous experience that without the resources, people will remain on the streets. We must remember there are people behind the statistics. These are individuals, sometimes families, neighbors and coworkers, or even our children’s classmates. We must do everything we can to support them,” said Gordon McHenry, Jr., president & CEO of United Way King County.

“We’re heartened whenever we see the need for more housing amplified. But the rich promise offered by safe, healthy, and affordable housing can only be fully realized when housing is addressed as a part of a comprehensive strategy that recognizes, respects, and responds to all challenges to a person’s well-being and stability. These interrelated challenges require not only urgency and clarity, but the kind of forceful cross-sector resolve this action so powerfully embodies,” said Marty Kooistra, executive director at Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County.

“I believe this is a first step in true collaboration between the business and provider communities. Chronic unsheltered homelessness is too big of an issue for any one sector to go it alone. This charter provides a road map for business, service providers, government, and philanthropy to address this crisis together. It ensures ALL members of our community are treated with dignity and care and have access to basic needs, like housing and services,” said Paul Lambros, CEO at Plymouth Housing.

“The root causes of homelessness are complex and many stem from deep systemic, social inequalities. The solutions must be collaborative, comprehensive and empathetic to better support our unsheltered neighbors. This amendment provides a pathway for our community partners to come together and bring about real change,” said Angela Dunleavy, CEO at FareStart.

“The experience of homelessness is extremely hard on people, and disproportionately affects people of color and people with disabilities. What works to change that is a caring and compassionate approach combined with the resources needed for people to have a safe place to stay and receive services tailored to their individual needs. I am glad to have this vision clearly stated and endorsed by such a wide range of people,” said Daniel Malone, executive director at Downtown Emergency Services Center.

“Homelessness is not a political statement. It’s a humankind crisis. This amendment isn’t perfect, but it is an important first step in working collaboratively, as a community to develop effective solutions to help our most vulnerable citizens.,” said Gina Hall, executive director, Uplift Northwest.

“It’s good to see agreement emerge that it’s going to take all of us working together to build homes for all, and it’s gratifying to see so many diverse leaders commit to that effort,” said Steve Woolworth, CEO at Evergreen Treatment Services.

“DSA has been at the table with key stakeholders to help shape this much-needed action to address the crisis of chronic homelessness,” said Downtown Seattle Association President & CEO Jon Scholes. “This is the type of approach our members have long advocated for to ensure we can bring more people inside and provide the services they need.”

About the Campaign to Collect Signatures

Compassion Seattle is the registered campaign committee for the purpose of collecting signatures. It is an alliance of business, civic, and community leaders that has come together to adopt the Charter amendment through the citizen initiative process. Compassion Seattle will deploy volunteers and a signature collection firm to obtain the 33,0060 valid signatures. Signature collection will begin immediately after Seattle City Clerk review and the City Attorney provides the ballot title.

To join Compassion Seattle in social discussion, visit LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

Media Contact

Jacque Seaman / Aaron Blank
compassion@feareygroup.com
(206) 343-1543
Interviews available upon request

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